Mayor Honored for Leading Kentucky League of Cities

It wasn’t the traditional banquet to honor the outgoing president, but a surprise luncheon Wednesday was the best alternative for the Kentucky League of Cities and London officials to recognize Mayor Troy Rudder for his year-long work leading the statewide group. 

The mayor was surprised when he learned that another routine luncheon at the London Community Center was actually to honor his work for the KLC, which represents 380 cities in Kentucky.

He volunteered to work on the group’s insurance committee about 15 years ago, then took on increasing responsibility and was elected president of the KLC for 2020-21. 

“It’s been a whirlwind ride the last year,” Rudder said during his impromptu speech at the luncheon. 

“Covid kind of cheated me a little as president. How many Zoom meetings did I attend last year? Felt like hundreds. But we still got a lot accomplished and had a productive legislative session.” 

Covid also canceled the KLC’s banquet in which the outgoing president is honored and the gavel is passed to the next president. Instead, the group prepared a video thanking Mayor Rudder and listed a number of his accomplishments in the last year. 

“You’ve been a guiding star for this organization during a very challenging time for all of us,” KLC Executive Director J.D. Chaney said in the video.

“You always say to leave it better than you found it. That’s the hallmark of public service. Not only have you done that for the City of London over the past 40 years as councilman and mayor, but you also did that for KLC. Your track record speaks for itself.” 

Mayor Rudder said he was proud to lead the group of influential city officials from across the state. 

“All those people put their trust in me,” he said.

“It blew me away when they acknowledged I had what it takes to lead that amazing organization.”  

COVID Testing Sites

From the Laurel County Health Department:

Have you tested positive for COVID-19 or been a close contact of someone who has tested positive?

If you receive a positive COVID-19 test result, please isolate yourself immediately. Do not wait on a call from the health department to isolate. It may be 24-48 hours after you receive your positive test result before you are contacted by our office. It is also important to make sure the testing location you had your test performed at has your correct phone number. Isolation Information for COVID-19 Positive Cases: https://laurelcohealthdept.org/…/Case-One-Pager-11-16…

If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19:

Due to the increase in cases in our county, you may not be contacted by our office if you are a close contact of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. We are asking the positive case to contact anyone they have had close contact with during their incubation period to let them know they need to quarantine. *There are certain instances in which we are still calling close contacts, but in many instances, we will not be calling them.

*If you are FULLY VACCINATED and have been in contact with a positive COVID-19 case: https://chfs.ky.gov/…/QuarantineofVaccinatedPersonsGuid…

If you are NOT FULLY VACCINATED and have been in contact with a positive COVID-19 case: https://laurelcohealthdept.org/…/New-CDC-Quarantine…

Yandell Recognized for Service to the City

The late Bruce Yandell served London with distinction and dedication in several capacities beginning in 1991 when he was elected to the London City Council. In 1994, Yandell was appointed to the London-Laurel Joint Planning Commission and the London Board of Zoning Adjustment in 2001. He served as chairman of the planning and zoning adjustment for many years. These appointments involved technical, thankless tasks that Yandell undertook with enthusiasm and professionalism.

According to his wife, Judy, they sometimes had to postpone or cancel vacations because Yandell had a planning or zoning meeting “that may wind up lasting only 10 minutes. He loved the city and its residents.”

On Monday night, the London City Council, as well as representatives from the planning and zoning commission and the board of adjustment, approved a declaration honoring Yandell for his years of service to the city.

“Bruce Yandell was an example of London’s exemplary, dedicated and honorable elected and appointed public officials serving the residents of London,” the declaration says.

In the photo, Mayor Troy Rudder presents a framed copy of the declaration to Judy Yandell. At left is Shirell Hall with the board of adjustments, and at right is Berry Cupp with the planning and zoning commission.

London Fire Department Announces Critical Incident Stress Management Team

Emergency preparedness goes beyond an incident for the London Fire Department. The Department has formed a new Critical Incident Stress Management Team (CISM) to address and decrease the possibility of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with first responders and their families that may develop after an incident.

“We are here to help the helpers, recognizing signs of stress, PTSD, or depression early could save a life,” said Firefighter David King, who is spearheading the Department’s group.

The team is made up of eight peers within the London Fire Department with backgrounds ranging in case management, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), and those with decades of experience in serving the community through emergency services.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) first responders are at a high risk for suicide and PTSD due to the environments they work in, their culture, and stress, both occupational and personal. Law enforcement officers and firefighters are more likely to die by suicide that in the line of duty. Studies have found that between 17-24 percent of public safety telecommunicators have symptoms of PTSD and 24 percent have symptoms of depression.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reported that Depression and PTSD affect an estimated 30 percent of America’s first responders – compared to 20 percent of the general population.

Firefighter King said that peers and co-workers often notice a change in behavior or attitude before a supervisor does. The London Fire Department’s CISM is versed in recognizing the warning signs of stress and can offer help more quickly to address how to help a fellow first responder or family member before their stress becomes more impactful to their physical or mental health.

“First responders and their families are faced with higher stress levels than citizens who don’t deal with dangerous or life-threatening daily uncertainties,” King said, adding, “The job is unpredictable and often you find yourself facing back-to-back emergencies that can trigger intense stress that lasts for hours.”

Warning signs of stress may include but are not limited to:

  • Irritability towards coworkers, family, and friends
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Difficulty sleeping, increased sleeping, or nightmares
  • Feelings of sadness, anxiety, or guilt
  • Loss of appetite
  • Loss of interest in work
  • Isolation
  • Increased use of substances
  • Chronic pain such as headache or backache
  • Feelings of hopelessness

For first responders or families of first responders wishing to utilize the CISM team, please contact Firefighter King at (606) 864-2922 or email him at david.king@londonky.gov. For more information about the team, visit www.londonkyfire.com/cism.

For more information about the London Fire Department, visit londonkyfire.com or their Facebook page www.facebook.com/londonfiredept. For further questions about services the Department offers, call (606) 864-2922.

/* ]]> */